4 results for tag: Video


No Bees, No Food – Pollination

Watch John Miller, Commercial Beekeeper from North Dakota and Northern California, discuss his role in the pollination industry. Commercial beekeeper John Miller has fought to help keep our world's natural pollinators alive. "The link between plants and bees is a seductive life cycle, and for 120 years my family has kept bees," he said, describing what he believes is the best job ever. However, over the last 70 years, America has lost half of its bee colonies due to their inability to find pasture, the increasing harm from pesticide and the viral predator bug, the verroa destructor. He came to TEDxUNC to remind us- no bees, no food.

Splits

Splits, or "increase" as it is referred to in some parts of the US, are usually performed by beekeepers in the spring.  Splits allow us to recover from winter losses and grow our apiaries with new hives.  Beekeepers have referred to splits as "nucs" or nucleus hives as they are normally comprised of: As a management practice, splits are used to reduce the likelihood of colonies issuing a swarm.  Beekeepers reduce the colony population by removing frames of capped brood when creating splits, thereby reducing originating colony congestion. James Ranne of the Concho Valley Beekeepers Association offers his method of performing splits for ...

Swarms

Swarms are a natural phenomenon in beekeeping that all of us will have an opportunity to manage at some point along our journey.  Once members of your community find out that you are a beekeeper, the phone will start ringing throughout the spring as swarms appear. At the point where honey bees become so congested in their hive, the workers bees will choose several larvae of the proper age, and start feeding them copious amounts of royal jelly.  These larva are then nurtured to become queen cells.  Swarm cells are normally found at the bottom of the frame along the bottom bar.  Workers then begin to reduce food provided to the existing queen ...

Websites

Websites often take a long time to plan, design, fill with wonderful content and launch without any issues.  Chris Doggett and I have been working diligently with the cooperation of the other TBA Officers and Directors to bring you this new website. Trusted sources of information related to beekeeping can be difficult to find.  Everyone with a computer, digital camera (or video camera), can be an "instant expert" by creating YouTube videos, websites, or posting to on-line forums. We have become an on-line community and with that comes the ability to transact business on-line.  We have added the ability to manage your membership, ...